Pets help their owners fall asleep more easily and feel better about their neighbourhood

Older people who own pets fall asleep more easily and feel consistently more positive about their local environment than those who don’t have animals, according to new research from Kingston University and St George's, University of London.

Health and wellbeing expert Gill Mein conducted the research along with statistician Robert Grant.


PhD researcher wins £100K Wellcome Trust grant

Researcher and lecturer Dr Florencia Cavodeassi has received a major grant from the Wellcome Trust’s Seed Awards in Science.

 


E-cigarettes research shows clear benefits of switching from tobacco

October has been designated ‘Stoptober’ again by the NHS as part of its ongoing campaign to persuade us to stop smoking.

Latest figures from the WHO show that smoking is still the number one preventable disease, killing seven million people globally each year. Stoptober is timely for Senior Lecturer Alexis Bailey who has presented preliminary results from his research on e-cigarettes at SRNT, the top nicotine and tobacco research conference, in Munich last month.There has been a meteoric rise of electric cigarette use in the UK since their introduction in 2006. In the UK, e-cigarettes are used by smokers to help them stop smoking as well as by former smokers, and it is estimated that there are 3.2 million e-cigarette users in the UK alone.


The Class of 2018 share their stories

On 19 July, the Class of 2018 came together for one final time at the St George’s Graduation Ceremony to receive their degrees, celebrate their success and wave goodbye to the end of an era. Among them was a PhD student completing his second St George’s degree, a biomedical scientist who will be returning to St George’s for postgraduate study and a 43 year old who was inspired to retrain as a doctor following a bout of illness.

3 October 2018

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PhD student shortlisted for Max Perutz Science Writing Award

St George's PhD student Natasha Clarke has been shortlisted for the Max Perutz Science Writing Award for her essay submission ‘How artificial intelligence, and a cup of tea, could help diagnose Alzheimer's disease'. The award asks Medical Research Council funded PhD students to write up to 800 words about their research and why it matters, in a way that would interest a non-scientific audience. It is named after 1962 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry Dr Max Perutz.

Of her essay submission Natasha says, “I am using language to try and help spot the signs of disease sooner. For part of my research I'm studying the spoken language of people diagnosed with early Alzheimer's, compared to people ageing healthily, following them over one year.

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