Meet the Researcher: Professor Mark Edwards on movement control disorders

Professor Mark Edwards is a consultant neurologist who studies how the brain controls movement and how abnormalities of movement occur in people with neurological illness.

He leads the Motor Control and Movement Disorder Group at St George’s, comprised of neurologists, psychiatrists, physiotherapists and basic scientists.

Mark Edwards Photo

Inspiring pupils to consider higher education

St George’s, University of London recently hosted its first outreach event for state school pupils in partnership with award-winning charity, the Brilliant Club. 

St George’s Widening Participation team have recently formed a collaborative partnership with the Brilliant Club, and will be working closely with the charity to run events for groups of state school pupils, many of whom come from communities that are under-represented at university.

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Assessing body fat in children made simpler by new equation

 

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First study to evaluate mental health decision units is underway

A major two year study investigating England's mental health decision units (MHDUs) is being spearheaded by researchers at St George's.

The mixed methods study, known as the Decision study, has been funded by the NIHR. Mental Health Decision units have recently emerged in Mental Health NHS trusts, and are an innovative source of support for people undergoing acute mental health crises. Usually situated in or near mental health hospitals, they provide 24 hour facilities for enhanced assessment, intense treatment and onward signposting. They do not have ward status, and are for a short stay only, from a few hours to a maximum of 3 days. A typical unit might offer shared living quarters with access to snacks and drinks, chairs or recliner beds and meeting or treatment rooms.

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Short-term pedometer interventions produce significant health benefits several years later

Research which followed up two 12-week pedometer-based walking trials in adults showed long-term health benefits for the participants four years later.

Participants in the intervention groups in the PACE-UP and PACE-LIFT studies showed significantly fewer cardiovascular events, including heart attacks and strokes, as well as suffering fewer fractures, compared with those in the control groups in the studies.